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of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact, the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home, cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know, britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well, angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute, britain can't work out os own special deal.
to have the debt armageddon crisis or physical cliff, is euro going to explode, so many covers of the euro bursting into flames. >> is japan going to get washington, d.c. into the sea or will this incredible debt burden just crush them? and the fact is that for the last four years, all of those risks, every single one has been overstated, overstated by people in the marketplace. emerging markets are actually much more unstable than that and yet. >> they are thought unstable. >> they are responsible to for two-third of the world's growth, about three quarters by the end of the decade, and yet these are countries that are much more volume tile, volatile and much more opaque. >> rose: let's talk about who they include, china, india, brazil, and turkey and -- >> some of them are doing reasonably well, some include the bricks but three of the bricks bricks are facing head wind greater than we have seen in the united states, not brazil, which is developing increasingly becoming more regularized but in the china and russia, and i go back to the beginning. >> rose: the risk is what is going to ha
's human rights council. bbc news in moscow. >> stocks rose today as the euro hit an 11-month high. investors took heart that europe's financial crisis may have eased. it is ironic as the situation improves, the real economic situation for many europeans its worst -- gets worse. the british economy shrunk more than expected. the belgian economy is just as bleak. throughout northern and southern europe, the fear is losing your job. >> the fire has been burning for three months fell, who arming the striking workers. they are the latest victims of europe's economic crisis. say goodbye to the sprawling ford factory in eastern belgium. it is shutting down. with europe in recession, they are not selling enough vehicles. >> is a disaster for the region. 11,000 jobs were lost. we hope there are other jobs. >> i am feeling very insecure. i am feeling very insecure for the future. >> insecure and angry, which is why the workers have impounded 7000 cars. it is a new bargaining chip in their negotiations. what is happening shows how the eurozone debt crisis is becoming an economic and social c
description last year. i think they ran eight different cover stories, showing the euro either blowing up or breaking apart or bursting into flames. not going to happen. no greek exit. no anybody else exit. but the austerity that is hitting, and hitting hard, precisely because the germans are trying to create fiscal union, and ultimately more accountability for the budgets of these peripheral countries, is hurting pretty bad. europe, you're definitely going to see significant continued pain across the eurozone, but the downside is not what people thought it was. and, frankly, that's going to slow progress because the markets won't put as much pressure on the eurozone and the bonds on these countries. >> tom: let's go from europe to emerging markets. i want to present some data from the i.m.f., forecasting the advanced economies growing at 1.5%, and emerging markets at over 5%. what are emerging markets your top risk then? >> emerging markets shouldn't be treated as a single asset class. some are increasingly developing, and as a kwon conconsequence great places to be, like turkey and braz
stagnation in the euro area as a whole will rise if the momentum for reform is not maintained." so the core still remains at risk, correct? >> they are at risk. there are a number of policies that have to be put in place. for the most part, they have indicated what they intend to do. they just have to do it. >> tom: are you referring to government spending cuts or or the central bank continuing with the firewall and protection. >> i was thinking about two things. the program that the b.c. b.has put in place, which has not been taken up. but if it needed to be taken up, i think it should. the other is the progress on the banking union, which is a really important thing. they have taken the first steps, jut the first steps. there is quite a way to go. >> tom: let's talk a little about the united states, because you do address the u.s., and obviously congress and the president keep putting off decisions on spending cuts for america's government budget. how does that postponement impact your forecast? >> we have assumed that basically the fiscal confrontation for this year will be about 1.25%.
the average for the entire 20th century. unemployment across the euro- zone countries has hit another record high, 11.8%, in november. the european union reported today the jobless rate rose more than a full percentage point from a year earlier. greece had the single biggest year-to-year increase, jumping seven points to 26%. across the e.u., some 26 million people were out of work. wall street was down again today as the market marked time, waiting for corporate earnings announcements. the dow jones industrial average lost 55 points to close under 13,329. the nasdaq fell seven points to close below 3092. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: we return to the u.s. consulate attack in benghazi, the only known suspect held in connection with the incident was released today in tunisia. his attorney said he was freed because of a lack of evidence. the attack, which killed u.s. ambassador to libya christopher stevens and three other americans was seen by large crowds and captured on security cameras, but the culprits have remained elusive. libyan witnesses have r
through kidnapping for ransom. they've made more than $30 million euros after kidnapping french citizens because the french will pay for the nationals to come back. up until this point, they hadn't taken an american hostage and now they have at least three. >> so they would view perhaps mali as the next afghanistan or having the possibility of being the next afghanistan before 9/11 when in fact it was a haven for al qaeda. >> there are parallels there because in some ways, you know as one u.s. official said to me half jokingly it's the world's worst neighborhood. you have islamic extrialists, you have al qaeda through aqim, you have drug traffickers up there in the north of mali. and you have just rebels who want some independence to split the country in two. so in that mix you have that worry that you can create within the chaos a command and control center. like what you saw al qaeda do through the taliban in afghanistan. so that's the fear that it can become a launch pad. >> rose: on another matter finally, when dow expect the secretary of state to testify about ben gazee-- ben gaddee
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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